Category: zdpypstl

  • Torrential Rains Destroy Roads in Nimba

    first_imgEven motorcyclists are not spared the bad road dilemmaLast week’s voting in several parts of Nimba was disturbed by heavy rains which messed up road networks causing delays at some polling centers, the offices of the National Elections Commission (NEC) in the county have said.The NEC complained about the stretch of road between Gban Town, just a stone’s throw east of Ganta, and Saclepea, the central region, which is in ruins as the torrential rains in recent weeks have made travel in and to that part of the county nearly impossible.The persistent rains have turned most roads in the county from dusty chariot paths to sinuous strips that look more or less like brown mashed potatoes. Some residents are  taking advantage of the situation to dig along the worst sections, thus compounding the condition of the roads, travelers have said.The situation has also stalled commercial activities thereby causing prices of goods and services to increaseThe results, according to passengers who confided in the Daily Observer, are serious inconveniences in travel and in some cases accidental deaths. A recent one involved a motorcyclist, Kadiker Whyear, affectionately known as KDK, who lost his life while reportedly bypassing a broken down vehicle on one of the dilapidated bridges in the county’s Electoral District #5 near Gruzenplay Town. The young motorcyclist who died on October 12 at the scene of the accident, has been buried in Nyor-Butuo Town.To help ease the tension, some of Gban youth created a detour for the cyclists, but extortion is recordedMotorcyclists who try to relieve travelers of the stress of getting to their destinations have themselves endured the worst of the condition of the roads. Young residents from communities along the impassable stretches have grouped themselves to exploit motorcyclists who get stuck in the mud along the detours they (youngsters) create by extorting money.Meanwhile, these photos from the Gban Town near Ganta clearly tell the rest of the story.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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  • AFC cannot deny role in GECOM selection – Jagdeo

    first_imgNo sidetracking will workAlthough the Alliance For Change (AFC) has attempted to remove itself from the process that led to the unilateral appointment of a new Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) Chairman, the Opposition has claimed that one of its senior members was active and present for most of the discussions.GECOM Chairman, Retired Justice James PattersonOpposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo has rubbished the arguments made by several AFC members who have sought to claim that their party played no role in the process.Addressing the media on Monday, Jagdeo said the public views made by these members point to a fact that the AFC is opportunistic.The Opposition Leader noted that AFC leader Raphael Trotman was at two meetings between himself and President David Granger. He recalled that Trotman was there when the President decided that the third list was unacceptable and agreed to set up a special task force to deal with the matter.“Trotman was at the meeting when we agreed that should the third list fail, we were going to establish a high level committee to work this through in a collaborative fashion until we got a Chairman who is acceptable to both sides… He was not a passive participant,” Jagdeo recalled.AFC Leader Raphael TrotmanFurther, Jagdeo said that the AFC leader helped to draft the joint press release with Opposition Member of Parliament Anil Nandlall. “It was (Joseph) Harmon, Trotman and Anil Nandlall who drafted the two paragraph press release. So, Trotman knew that there was a joint commitment to the nation that should the third list be rejected by the President then we will set up a Committee,” he added.Jagdeo therefore believes that Trotman and the AFC can’t exclude themselves totally. “Why did Trotman not say to the President, Mr President you are going to be deemed untrustworthy, you are not keeping your word, because I sat with the Opposition on this matter and we drafted something, a joint approach we agreed to, and your current action is in direct contradiction to the commitment that you gave.”The former Head of State argued that Trotman lacked the courage, decency and integrity to do that but his party (AFC) cannot come and remove itself from the entire process for convenience sake. And based on statements made by another AFC member, Minister Dominic Gaskin about the AFC’s perceived non-involvement, Jagdeo again said no amount of sidetracking can help the party.When told that Trotman may have acted in the place of Attorney General Basil Williams due to his absence, Jagdeo argued that Trotman is also the leader of the AFC and that should have also taken prominence. “Even if he was there as acting Attorney General, he is the leader of the AFC. His party is being questioned now, their role in this matter… I’m just pointing out they had a more involved presence than just passive onlookers as Gaskin and the others are trying to portray.”While the AFC had said in a statement that they played no role in the selection of the new GECOM Chairman, the party had also sought to justify the appointment, noting that it recognised that the necessity had arisen for the President not to further delay the appointment of a Chairman.According to the AFC, the appointment in the President’s own deliberate judgement has averted a “looming constitutional crisis.”Meanwhile, the Opposition People’s Progressive Party (PPP) had filed an injunction in the High Court to rescind the appointment on the grounds of unconstitutionality. The injunction is seeking a declaration that Justice Patterson is not qualified to be appointed in provision with Article 161-2 of the Constitution of Guyana.The injunction is also seeking an order to have the appointment of Justice Patterson as Chairman of GECOM quashed and directing the President to choose a person from the 18 names submitted to him by the Leader of the Opposition.The injunction was filed in the name of the Executive Secretary of the PPP and Member of Parliament (MP) Zulfikar Mustapha, who is an elected official that has legal authority.The matter will be heard before the Chief Justice on Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 13:15h. (Samuel Sukhnandan)last_img read more

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  • Top Cop says gang violence could spread to Fort St. John

    first_imgOne of the province’s top cops is warning that gang violence is spreading from Metro Vancouver to B-C’s Interior. RCMP Assistant Commissioner Al Macintyre yesterday told the House of Commons justice committee that the spread has reached towns as far away as Fort St. John. Macintyre was among a number of Vancouver-area officers who told the committee that police and prosecutors need the legal cuffs removed if they’re going to fight the region’s gang problem. – Advertisement -He said the number of homicides this year could reach record levels if the current violence continues.last_img read more

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  • Construction stays steadily ahead of 2009

    first_imgConstruction in the Energetic City continues to charge ahead of last year’s pace.The monthly building numbers from the City show 33 permits for construction were issued in July, worth $4.94 million.- Advertisement -The July numbers are roughly on par with the figures from June, 2010, and keep the value of construction in 2010 at more than double the 2009 levels.So far in 2010, Fort St. John has issued 175 construction permits worth almost $28 million, compared to 144 permits worth almost $12.5 million at the same time last year.The City’s revenue from the July permits is $25,670, for a 2010 total of approximately $144,000.last_img read more

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  • Committee turns back Dodger trio

    first_imgVERO BEACH, Fla. – Dodgers legends Gil Hodges, Don Newcombe and Maury Wills failed to gain entry to baseball’s Hall of Fame yet again on Tuesday, and so did everyone else whose name appeared on the ballot of a veterans committee that seems to have impossibly high standards. The late Hodges, a cornerstone of the Brooklyn Dodgers teams of the 1950s, received 50 of the 62 votes needed for election (75 percent of the 82 ballots cast). Wills, who stole a then-record 104 bases and won the NL Most Valuable Player award in 1962 and currently works as a spring-training instructor with the team, received 33 votes. But no one got in, including former Chicago Cubs third baseman Ron Santo, who got 57 votes. Longtime major-league pitcher Jim Kaat was just behind Santo and just ahead of Hodges, and former outfielder Tony Oliva finished between Hodges and Wills. Newcombe got 17 votes. The veterans committee was restructured after 2001, when it elected Bill Mazeroski to the Hall. The result was a committee that now includes all 61 living members of the Hall, along with a handful of writers and broadcasters – and a committee that has yet to elect a single player to the Hall in six years of voting. Longtime Dodgers owner Walter O’Malley, who died in 1979, also fell short on the “composite” ballot for non-playing personnel. Lid lifter The Dodgers will take five regular position players – one more than the league-mandated minimum for road games – to Walt Disney World for their Grapefruit League opener on Thursday against Atlanta. Shortstop Rafael Furcal will lead off and be followed by center fielder Juan Pierre, with third baseman Wilson Betemit, catcher Russell Martin and right fielder Andre Ethier batting down the lineup. Reserve infielders Olmedo Saenz (1B) and Ramon Martinez (2B) also will start, as will outfield prospect Matt Kemp in left. Left-handed starter Randy Wolf is tentatively scheduled to pitch two innings, followed by Chad Billingsley and non-roster invitee Travis Smith for two innings each. center_img Little hopes to get an inning apiece for Chin-Hui Tsao, Tim Hamulack and Jonathan Meloan. Sailing along Although Little plans to protect Takashi Saito’s injured right calf by holding him out of game action until at least the latter part of next week, the closer has been on a regular throwing program all spring and has even started a running regimen. “He threw two innings of (live) batting practice (Monday) and came out of it great,” Little said. “He is gradually increasing his running, which is all great.” Saito hurt himself while jogging in Japan more than a month ago, then aggravated the injury when he tried to resume running about three weeks later. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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  • Village People to give show

    first_imgThe series will begin at 8p.m. July14 with Expos , featuring all three original members. The group was known for such ’80s and ’90s hits as “Seasons of Change,” “What You Don’t Know” and “When I Look at Him.” The Village People will perform at 8p.m. July21 in a return to Palmdale. In 2003, the disco group attracted 10,000 fans to a performance, largest-ever crowd in the Starlight Concert Series. “When you see 10,000 people doing `YMCA,’ it’s a fun thing,” said Steve Buffalo, the city’s special-events manager. The series will continue at 8p.m. July28 with country star Phil Vassar. Vassar is known for such songs as “Just Another Day in Paradise” and “Six-Pack Summer.” He is also known for writing hit songs for other artists, including “Right on the Money” for Alan Jackson and “My Next Thirty Years” for Tim McGraw. At 8p.m. on Aug.11, music and comedy act Williams and Ree will perform, followed by Grammy Award winner Pam Tillis. Tillis is known for such hits as “Shake the Sugar Tree” and “When You Walk in the Room.” Herman’s Hermits, starring Peter Noone, will perform at 8p.m. on Aug.18. The group is known for such hits as “There’s a Kind of Hush” and “Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter.” Wrapping up the series will be a performance by Adbacadabra at 7:30p.m. on Sept.8. The group performs what it calls the “ultimate ABBA tribute,” including the songs “Dancing Queen” and “Take a Chance on Me.” “We did a tribute concert to ABBA several years ago, and it was so successful people wanted to see it come back,” Buffalo said. In June, city officials expect to announce the lineup for a jazz festival that will be held Sept.15.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PALMDALE – The group that turned the YMCA into a disco classic will perform at Palmdale’s summer Starlight Concert Series. The Village People, of “YMCA” and “Macho Man” fame, head a list of performers that also includes the band Expos , country artists Phil Vassar and Pam Tillis, music and comedy duo Williams and Ree, Herman’s Hermits, and ABBA tribute group Adbacadabra, city officials said Thursday. The series of free concerts will be held at the Palmdale Amphitheater at Marie Kerr Park, 2723 Rancho Vista Blvd. “We think we’ve got an outstanding lineup this year, one that is a lot of fun and will be appealing to a wide array of interests in music,” said Russ Bird, Palmdale’s director of parks and recreation. last_img

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  • Grande Prairie RCMP searching for missing female

    first_imgIt is believed that she moved the Grande Prairie recently however she has lived in the Red Deer area previously.Walker is described as 5’7″, 130 pounds, with long black hair which is shoulder length without extensions. She has blue eyes and a tattoo under her ear and down the side of the neck.Anyone with information is asked to call the Grande Prairie RCMP at 780-830-5700 or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477.- Advertisement –last_img

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  • ‘Klopp is tremendous… and he could be heading to the Premier League’

    first_imgThomas Hitzlsperger has described Jurgen Klopp as a ‘tremendous manager’ and believes the outgoing Borussia Dortmund boss could be set for the Premier League.Klopp announced on Wednesday he is to leave the Bundesliga side in the summer, and is being talked about as a potential replacement for Manuel Pellegrini at Manchester City.Speaking on the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast, former Germany midfielder Hitzlsperger said: “He has changed Dortmund around in the last seven years and he has made no secret of his desire to be in the Premier League one day.“I wouldn’t be surprised [to see him in the Premier League]. He is a tremendous manager and if he wants to be in the Premier League soon, I’m sure there will be a club that wants to take him on.”last_img read more

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  • Water bill is Bush’s first veto override

    first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre “The president is standing up for the taxpayers,” White House press secretary Dana Perino said. “No one is surprised that this veto is overridden. We understand that members of Congress are going to support the projects in their districts. Budgeting is about making choices and defining priorities – it doesn’t mean you can have everything. This bill doesn’t make the difficult choices; it says we can fund every idea out there. That’s not a responsible way to budget.” The bill funds hundreds of Army Corps of Engineers projects, such as dams, sewage plants and beach restoration, that are important to local communities and their representatives. It also includes money for the hurricane-hit Gulf Coast and for Florida Everglades restoration efforts. The House voted 361-54 to override the veto Tuesday. Both votes easily exceeded the two-thirds majority needed in each chamber to negate a presidential veto. WASHINGTON – President George W. Bush suffered the first veto override of his seven-year-old presidency Thursday as the Senate enacted a $23 billion water resources bill despite his protest that it was filled with unnecessary projects. The 79-14 vote included 34 Republicans who defied the president. Enactment was a foregone conclusion, but it still marked a milestone for a president who spent his first six years with a much friendlier Congress controlled by his Republican Party. Now he confronts a more hostile, Democratic-controlled legislature, and Thursday’s vote showed that most of the Republicans will defy him on spending matters dear to their political careers. Bush’s spokeswoman portrayed the issue as a divide between a budget-conscious president and a big-spending Congress. The last such veto override happened when Congress dealt President Clinton the second of his two overrides in February 1998. Bush vetoed no bills during his first five years in office. He has since vetoed a stem cell research bill twice, an Iraq spending bill that set guidelines for troop withdrawals, and a children’s health insurance bill. House and Senate Republicans managed to sustain those vetoes. But they broke ranks on the Water Resources Development Act, or WRDA, which Bush vetoed on Nov. 2, calling it too expensive. Thirty-four Republicans voted with the 43 Democrats and two independents to override the veto. Two Democrats, Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri and Russ Feingold of Wisconsin, voted with 12 Republicans to sustain Bush’s veto. His supporters have noted that the Army Corps has a backlog of $58 billion worth of projects and an annual budget of about $2 billion to address them. The bill, the first water system restoration and flood control authorization passed by Congress since 2000, would cost $11.2 billion over the next four years, and $12 billion in the 10 years after that, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Flood protection projects along the Gulf Coast, including 100-year levee protection in New Orleans, would cost about $7 billion if fully funded. The bill approves projects but does not fund them. Some of Bush’s most ardent allies argued for the override. “This bill is enormously important, and it has been a long time coming,” said Sen. David Vitter, R-La., whose state was hammered by Hurricane Katrina two years ago. The bill “is one of the few areas where we actually do something constructive,” said Senate Minority Whip Trent Lott, R-Miss. What Bush sees as pork barrel items, Lott said, “are good, deserved, justified projects.” “Almost every president opposes this type of bill,” he said. Democrats are sure to remind such Republicans of their rejection of Bush’s budgetary concerns when debate turns to several spending bills he also vows to veto. Democrats, frustrated by their inability to force Bush’s hand on Iraq and other matters, clearly enjoyed their victory Thursday. Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., said the message to the White House was, “you can’t keep rolling over us like this.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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  • Caring capitalism

    first_imgROCHESTER, N.Y. – Teresa Fritschi seeks out artisans in hidden corners of Scotland, pays generously for their lamb’s-wool blankets, Orkney driftwood chairs and organic-tweed jackets, and peddles their indigenous craftsmanship to a far-flung audience over the Internet. James Potemkin is a kindred spirit who specializes in selling the rugs, furniture and art he finds in rural Mexico and Guatemala. And Raquel Marchenese fills up her One World Goods store with onyx from Pakistan, scorched gourds from Peru and scented soaps from a women’s cooperative in Chicago. They are a new breed of kindhearted capitalists: In a cutthroat global economy, they not only pay their suppliers more, but help them ring up extra sales by tacking on comparatively low markups. They share a passionate belief in fair trade, a fast-spreading phenomenon that aims to give businesses, cooperatives or solo artists in poor or marginalized parts of the world a higher price for what they create and a more direct route into lucrative markets in America, Europe and Asia. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant “There’s so many problems in the world,” said Marchenese, a Filipino immigrant who draws on scores of volunteers to run her nonprofit store in an upscale plaza in Pittsford, a Rochester suburb. “I cannot move mountains, but I can do the little bit that I do and I feel good about it.” Fritschi, 45, launched her Thistle & Broom venture last spring after losing a corporate marketing job and spending the next three years back home in western New York trying in vain to land another one. On a whim, she took a trip to Scotland and discovered its creative soul in locations as diverse as inner-city Glasgow and the Shetland and Orkney Islands. Linking up with some 70 artists, many of whom have leaned on part-time jobs to earn a living, she began selling their one-of-a-kind apparel, tableware and textiles online. What’s unusual about her burgeoning business, which she operates for now out of Edinburgh and a temporary home in New London, Conn., is her determination to pay her partners what they’re worth. They set their own prices – she sometimes has to prod them to charge more – and get 66 percent of the retail sale. Fritschi said her usual 33 percent markups are far below the 200-plus percent norm in the homegrown-luxury-goods market. She expects to generate more than $100,000 in sales in her first year and intends to set aside 8 percent of her profits for cultural-heritage and conservation causes in Scotland. “In the grand scheme of world economics, this is a drop in the bucket but it’s important for people who wouldn’t normally be able to reach this kind of audience,” she said. “I have customers from Norway and Sri Lanka and Southern California, people who are never going to get on a plane and drive eight hours to get to some of these remote places.” The fair trade movement sprouted in the United States after World War II and appears at last to be coming into its own after years as an activist-based niche. While still comprising a fraction of commerce, fair trade is increasingly being tugged in front of mainstream audiences by organizations such as Oakland-based Transfair USA, which certifies fair-trade compliance for a lengthening list of commodities from coffee, cocoa and tea to sugar, rice and fresh fruits. Those goods alone accounted for at least $500 million in U.S. sales last year, and $1.8 billion worldwide, said Transfair’s certification expert, Christopher Himes. The best performer is fair trade coffee, which has captured nearly 2 percent of the U.S. coffee market, he said. “We don’t want to make it harder to buy coffee or bananas or anything else,” Himes said. “We just want to make different options available for people who want to do the right thing but don’t really know how.” Among the independent group’s certification requirements are that producers get stable minimum prices, don’t allow forced or child labor and use environmentally sound, sustainable methods of production. Its ethical-label framework doesn’t yet straddle the apparel or craft markets. Like Fritschi, Potemkin dispenses with certification by going directly to the source. He knows by name many of the Mexican rug weavers, potters and wormwood-furniture makers he meets. On monthslong expeditions twice a year, he spends up to $40,000 to refill his Animas Traders and Animas Alta stores here. “I don’t argue over price and I’m not greedy,” Potemkin said by telephone during a recent stop in central Mexico. “In my heart, it’s very important to me that I can’t make more than the artisan.” Potemkin, 59, a “fair trader” since 1988 when he quit a teaching job, delights in seeing his regulars earn enough to keep their children in school or to add a room to their home. “I just buy things that I love and things I know will sell,” he said. “The market still is going to determine whether what they do has value.” Globalization has been going on for a long time, but what’s new is the exploitation of cheap labor by corporations, Potemkin said. “If you buy a shirt for $2 and sell it for $30, why not manufacture for $5?” he said. “It’s not very much and it transforms communities – they’ll have economic vitality in that region as opposed to economic enslavement.” One World Goods buys from fair-trade groups such as Ten Thousand Villages, a 75-store national network founded by the Mennonites in 1946, and turns over most of its profits – about $50,000 last year – to charities. “The better we do, the better it is for the artisans,” Marchenese said. “Many things here have a truly sculptural beauty, a warmth to them – they’re not touristy things,” said a regular customer, Barbara Beller, 63, who once picked out a soulful mask made in Congo with oddly uneven eyes. “I’m always wondering who made that and I wish I knew the artist,” she said. The AFL-CIO labor federation supports “commercial enterprises that want to compete by showing sincerely that they have a social conscience,” said its chief economist, Ron Blackwell. “God knows, we have to provide a space in the world’s economy for the least-developed countries,” Blackwell said. “We’ve got 2 billion people on this planet who live on less than $2 a day.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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