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  • Consumers complain most about TV services to Canadas telecom watchdog

    first_img Facebook The watchdog says it accepted 8,197 individual complaints, which addressed an average of 1.9 issues each. That’s an 18 per cent decrease from the year prior. The Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services received 8,678 complaints about TV issues between Aug. 1, 2015, and July 31 of this year, the CCTS says in its annual report. CCTS communications officer Alyssa Esposito said in an email that the watchdog will only accept and review any TV complaints it receives on or after Sept. 1 next year. Twitter Altogether, it dealt with 7,931 issues about wireless, 4,177 issues about Internet and 3,086 issues about local phone services. That’s up 19 per cent from 7,294 similar concerns during the same period a year prior. However, the CCTS commissioner and CEO Howard Maker said in a statement that the watchdog is also concerned about a rise in objections over 30-day cancellation policies and charges after services have been cancelled. Advertisement Maker said the CCTS will continue to monitor these grievances and collaborate with stakeholders on ensuring clarity and fairness for customers. Billing was the No. 1 consumer grievance in each of the three categories. But TV complaints won’t fall under the CCTS’s mandate until next September when it will begin to assess, accept and help resolve consumer beefs about these services.center_img Advertisement One of Canada’s telecom watchdogs received more consumer complaints about TV than any other service, even though television isn’t the agency’s responsibility. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: The CCTS said 89 per cent of the complaints it handled were resolved to customer satisfaction.By Aleksandra Sagan – The Canadian Pres This represented a decrease in the number of complaints for each company except Telus, which received 22.3 per cent more complaints against its services. Companies are prohibited from demanding customers provide 30 days’ notice to stop their wireless or Internet service. However, this year, the CCTS received 386 complaints about this practice from wireless customers (a decrease of 14.4 per cent from the year prior) and 399 complaints from Internet customers (an increase of 54.7 per cent). The largest number of all accepted complaints were registered against Bell (35.9 per cent), followed by Rogers (10.5 per cent) and Telus (seven per cent). Freedom Mobile, the company formerly known as Wind Mobile, and Virgin Mobile both represented 6.1 per cent. Currently, the CCTS can only address complaints about cellphone, land line, Internet and long-distance (including prepaid calling cards) services, as well as operator services, directory assistance and white pages directories.last_img read more

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  • MIKE MYERS SURPRISES CONCERTGOERS WITH AUSTIN POWERS PERSONA

    first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook TORONTO — It was a veritable smorgasbord of Canadiana as comedian Mike Myers surprised Los Angeles concertgoers by slipping into his Austin Powers persona.The Scarborough, Ont.-native jumped onto stage on Sunday night during a set by Crowded House frontman Neil Finn and his son Liam. The backing band included British Columbia native Mac DeMarco.Myers, wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with “Canada,” performed a rendition of “BBC,” a song made famous in his 1997 film “Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery.” Login/Register With: Clips were posted on the Instagram page for Largo, the club which hosted the concert, with a message saying the performance “brought the house down.” Myers has been stepping back into his comedy persona more frequently in recent months.He played Austin Powers’ arch-nemesis Dr. Evil on Jimmy Fallon’s late-night talk show, and showed up on Jimmy Kimmel as Donald Trump’s personal physician Harold Bornstein. Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Mike Myers, Mac DeMarco Credit: Getty Twitterlast_img read more

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  • Longtime Vancouver filmmaker Arvi Liimatainen producer of Da Vincis Inquest and Bye

    first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Arvi Liimatainen Advertisement B.C. and Alberta screen industries are mourning the loss of a longtime local filmmaker who worked on some of Western Canada’s most prominent films and TV series.Finnish-born Arvi Liimatainen died from cancer in Vancouver on May 19 at the age of 68.With a career spanning over four decades in screen industries, Liimatainen worked in numerous capacities, including as a studio technician, writer, film critic, story editor, actor, broadcaster, production manager, producer, executive producer, and director. Advertisement Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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  • ALEXISONFIRE LOUD WITH CHARLOTTE CARDIN RIVER TIBER AND MORE SONGS YOU NEED

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  • Women journey to site of controversial project in Labrador

    first_imgAPTN National NewsA group of women from Labrador and Nova Scotia are walking to a controversial project in Labrador.The Muskrat Falls project, the largest construction project in Atlantic Canada, will cost billions of dollars to build and employ thousands of people.But some are expressing concern about the project’s impact on the lives of Indigenous people living along the east coast.As APTN’s Ossie Michelin tells us, the women want to see the project for themselves.last_img

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  • Pro Indigenous pool player pockets cash for documentary

    first_imgAPTN National NewsNow, a success story about a young woman getting her first break at the Winnipeg Aboriginal Film Festival.APTN’s Jaydon Flett has this story about how a passion beginning in the pool room has led to the big screen.last_img

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  • Five federal cabinet ministers invited to attend roundtable on murdered missing Indigenous

    first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA—Five federal cabinet ministers have been invited to attend a planned Feb. 27 roundtable in Ottawa to discuss the high number of murdered and missing Indigenous women across the country.Status of Women Minister Kellie Leitch, Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt, Justice Minister Peter MacKay, Health Minister Rona Ambrose and Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney were sent letters last December asking them to attend the roundtable.The one-day meeting is expected to be chaired by the premier of the Northwest Territories, Bob McLeod. Premiers or their representatives from the other provinces and territories are also expected to attend the roundtable.The letter said the idea for the roundtable was born last summer during a meeting in Charlottetown between the premiers and the leaders of Aboriginal organizations.“There is no question that all Canadians and all governments are concerned with the high rates of violence against Indigenous—First Nations, Metis and Inuit—women and girls,” according to a copy of the letter obtained by APTN National News.The Dec. 19, 2014, dated invitations to the ministers were signed by the heads of six Aboriginal organizations including the Assembly of First Nations, the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Native Women’s Association of Canada, Women of the Metis Nation and Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada.Leitch and Ambrose’s offices have acknowledged receiving the invitation. Both said their ministers would soon respond.Valcourt’s office refused to answer any questions on the issue, referring queries to the Leitch’s office. Valcourt has blamed First Nations men for their lack of respect for women on reserve as one of the reasons a national inquiry into the nearly 1200 missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls won’t solve anything.MacKay and Blaney’s offices did not respond to request for comment from APTN National News as of this article’s posting.The Harper government has resisted calls for a national inquiry.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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  • Justice system report slams Alberta for hiding Indigenous incarceration rates

    first_imgThe Canadian Press The government of Alberta is being lambasted in a review of Canada’s justice system as the only province to keep secret the number of Indigenous people it has locked up over the last five years.The criticism comes as part of an annual report card released Monday by the Macdonald-Laurier Institute that ranks the provinces and territories in terms of access to justice, efficiency, cost, public safety and support for victims.Alberta is the only province that doesn’t make public its disproportionately high Indigenous incarceration rate, said report co-author Benjamin Perrin.“It’s unconscionable to keep secret the number of Indigenous people who are being sent to jail in that province every year,” said Perrin, who is a law professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.“We flagged this as a problem in our first report in the fall of 2016. We expected (Alberta) would start giving this data, but it hasn’t.”Alberta’s Justice Department said in a statement late Monday that it missed last year’s Statistics Canada deadline because of a software turnover and would provide the information moving forward.“Due to the transition to the new system, gaps in reporting (including indigenous-related data) occurred,” the statement said. “This was communicated to Statistics Canada and other agencies and is reflected in footnotes in reporting documents where appropriate.”But Perrin said the explanation is “a bit like ‘the dog ate my homework’ kind of excuse.”“This comes at a time of very serious concern about the treatment of Indigenous people by the justice system. People have a right to know,” he said.While Indigenous incarceration rates are disproportionately high everywhere in Canada, they are especially high in Alberta, B.C., Ontario, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, the report noted.The overall justice system received a mixed grade in Monday’s assessment, following last year’s inaugural review, which concluded the country suffered from a large and growing “justice deficit.”The 2017 report card celebrated a notable drop in crime rates and a boost in legal aid funding relative to the previous year, but those improvements were overshadowed by a spike in costs, lengthier court delays and the persistent over-representation of Indigenous people in prisons.The Ottawa-based think tank called for more data collection and monitoring by Statistics Canada to better identify and track problems that have, for too long, gone unacknowledged or unaddressed.The assessment called for additional research into how Canadians view the police, courts and justice system at large, as well as more information on victims of crime, including referral rates for victim services.Perrin also pointed to the need for more analysis of recidivism rates and the number of criminal cases that are stayed due to unreasonable delay.“By arming governments, police, courts and the public with this data, we hope that it can support better decision-making and law-reform efforts,” he said.The 2017 analysis dubbed Ontario the most improved jurisdiction after it rose to fourth place from seventh, while Quebec and British Columbia each dropped two rankings.Prince Edward Island continued to lead the pack, while Manitoba remained the lowest-ranked province, thanks in part to having one of the lowest victim restitution rates in the country and the highest proportion of accused offenders on remand while awaiting trial.The report also found a “shockingly high” rate of violent crime in the territories _ in some cases 10 times greater than their provincial counterparts, a situation Perrin described as “dire.”The assessment highlighted some areas of improvement, noting that, between 2016 and 2017, Canada as a whole saw a slight drop in crime rates, fewer police officers required per capita and rising support for legal aid.Among the many differences identified between various jurisdictions, a much higher proportion of accused people were found to be unlawfully at large in Quebec and Prince Edward Island compared with Nunavut, New Brunswick, or Ontario.Public confidence in the justice system and the courts were found to be lowest in Manitoba, B.C. and Quebec and highest in New Brunswick and Ontario. As for public confidence in police, the highest levels were observed in Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador, and lowest in Prince Edward Island, B.C. and Quebec.While the rates of police solving non-violent crimes has declined in most parts of the country over the last five years, B.C. earned the distinction of having the lowest rates of resolving both violent and non-violent crimes, at about 52 per cent and 20 per cent respectively.The federal justice department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.last_img read more

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  • National billboard art project showcasing Indigenous resilience

    first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsA new art exhibition is hitting the road and showcasing works from 50 contemporary Indigenous women artists across Canada.But instead of housing the pieces in a gallery space, the artwork will be displayed on approximately 170 billboards from coast to coast this summer.Resilience features artwork from some of the country’s most recognized female artists including Christi Belcourt, KC Adams and Annie Pootoogook.“It’s a celebration and affirmation of the vitality, complexity and diversity of Indigenous women’s art,” curator Lee-Ann Martin told APTN News at the launch for the exhibit.The project was started as a response to one of the Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report. According to the exhibit’s website, Resilience answers the call to support, “collaborations among Aboriginal peoples and the arts community to develop a reconciliation framework for Canadian heritage and commemoration.”Martin says she chose pieces which illustrated the complex relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canada.“It was important to me that the exhibition have a balance between celebrating our Indigenous culture, the history and contemporary realities,” said Martin. “[While] critiquing the history, the colonial history and also the ongoing devastation in the communities by the government and corporate interests.”A piece from the Resilience art exhibition.One of those pieces is from Cree and Ojibway artist KC Adam’s Perceptions series, which was originally displayed in Winnipeg four years ago. In it Adams tackles stereotypes and racism by letting subjects label themselves.“I feel like we’re going through a renaissance period of creativity with our expressions, our storytelling [and] sharing our voices,” said Adams.“It goes beyond victimhood.”In the past women have been viewed only as victims, but Resilience is changing that, adds Adams.“The great thing about women in the community is that it seems like we’re the ones leading the way,” she said.“Having these billboards accessible to not just to our community, but the entire Canadian community is absolutely incredible because they are going to see our perspective.”A drawing of a “Warrior Woman,” a photograph of water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and a painting depicting “Mother Earth” are some of the pieces included in the exhibition.“The last thing in the world that we all wanted to see was the notion of victimization for the women,” said Martin. “It was like no we are strong, we’ve endured, we are adaptable and we are resilient going into the future.”The project is produced by Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art (MAWA), a small Winnipeg-based art centre.The artwork will be placed on billboards along roads in major cities and reserves, including the 700 km Highway of Tears in British Columbia.“We kind of pieced it together so that the works would be seen by as many people as possible, the works would also be seen by as many Indigenous people as possible and the works would be placed in such a way it would be resonate with the home communities of the artist,” said Shawna Dempsey, co-director of MAWA.A piece from the Resilience art exhibition.For billboard locations across Canada visit https://resilienceproject.ca/en/  bhobson@aptn.calast_img read more

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  • 14 homes destroyed in Paddle Prairie Metis settlement in wildfire

    first_imgMembers were only told to leave when the fire was two kilometers away from the hamlet.Lori Wanuch, vice chair of the settlement, said the community was not given enough notice.“Our members did not take anything. They left their pets at home because we had two volunteers going around feeding the pets. So everyone thought their pets were fine,” said Wanuch.“The horses, everything was at home because as far as we knew we weren’t a threat from the Chuckegg Creek fire.”(People in Paddle Prairie left the community without belongings or pets. The fire was two kilometres away when the call came to evacuate. Photo couresty Dean Ducharme)When APTN News visited Paddle Prairie last week, members were taking in evacuees while creating their own evacuation plan.Elders, children and those with respiratory issues were told to leave due to the smoke.No one was expecting this.“I just talked to my brother and he said ‘we could lose it all,’” said Tina St. Germain, who volunteered to help evacuees last week.“I’m not sure how many homes are lost. With the smoke cover you have to wait until that lifts.”(The wildfire burning south from High Level covers 230,000 hectares. Photo courtesy: Dean Ducharme)St. Germain spoke with APTN from Peace River, a town taking in evacuees.She said her home is in the northern part of Paddle Prairie and in line with the fire.““When I walked in that house it wasn’t about the stuff. It was about the structure that you built your family around. Right?” she said, “I walked around in a daze. There was so much I could have grabbed.“I couldn’t even think all I could think was the memories.”Currently, there are 29 wildfires in Alberta.Wabasca and Bigstone Cree Nation have also been evacuated.There are more than a dozen communities that have been evacuated since the fires started two weeks ago, leaving evacuees scattered across the northern part of the province.tpimentel@aptn.ca@tamara_aptn The wildfire moving towards the Paddle Prairie Metis settlement in Alberta. Photo courtesy: Dean DucharmeTamara PimentelAPTN NewsMembers of the Paddle Prairie Métis settlement say they had no time to take any belongings in order to escape a massive wildfire that was just a couple of kilometres from their community.A message posted on Facebook Thursday evening from the settlement, reported that 14 homes had been lost in the 230,000 hectare wildfire.The community, located 720 km northwest of Edmonton along the MacKenzie Hwy, was forced to flee as winds from the north pushed the out of control fire near High Level, Alta. south toward Paddle Prairie.“It was still going hard when I left,” said council member Danielle Poitras in a phone interview from Grande Prairie.“I know we did lose some homes.”last_img read more

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  • Coast Guard Most fuel spilled from tank farm unrecoverable

    first_imgLess than 20 per cent of a 461,000-gallon (1.7-million-litre) gasoline spill in Texas during Hurricane Harvey was recovered by the company responsible, while the rest evaporated or soaked into the ground, a U.S. Coast Guard official said Thursday.Only a minor amount of the spill appeared to have escaped past containment berms at the Magellan Midstream Partners storage tank farm in the Houston suburb of Galena Park, said Coast Guard Lt. Commander Jarod Toczko. It’s the largest spill reported to date from the storm that made landfall in Texas last month.The Oklahoma-based company reported recovering about 2,000 barrels, or 84,000 gallons (320,000 litres), of gasoline in the days after the Aug. 31 spill, Toczko said. It’s unknown how much of the fuel evaporated and how much seeped into the ground.“We know how much spilled, but it’s difficult to say the exact amount evaporated,” he said.Gasoline is more volatile than oil, meaning it evaporates more quickly after it’s spilled. It’s also more likely to catch fire and can more rapidly penetrate the soil and potentially contaminate groundwater.Magellan spokesman Bruce Heine says a cleanup of contaminated soil at the company’s facility should be completed within a few weeks. He estimated that less than five gallons (19 litres) of fuel reached a small waterway adjacent to the company’s property that drains into the Houston Ship Channel. The rest was contained onsite.“Although we do not have an estimate of the total volume of soil that we will remove and replace at this time, the project will comply with all laws and regulations,” Heine said.State officials were not aware of any health concerns from the spill, according to Texas Commission of Environmental Quality spokeswoman Andrea Morrow.Environmentalists have criticized the official response to the accident, including not notifying the public more quickly about the scale of the spill.Magellan reported the total volume to federal officials on Sept 5. A day later, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency official told The Associated Press that the spill was a “2,500-gallon fuel oil spill at the Houston Magellan facility.”The volume was not publicly reported until Sept. 11, in a story by the AP. The EPA said in a statement this week it “provided “the best information it had at the time” when it used the lower figure.The AP has identified at least 34 above ground fuel storage tanks and tank batteries that failed during Harvey and released more than 600,000 gallons (2.2 million litres) combined of crude oil, gasoline and other chemicals.Two storage tanks failed in the Magellan case. Initial indications suggested the massive tanks floated off their foundations as floodwaters swamped the company’s tank farm, Toczko said. That’s what happened at tank farms in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina, when numerous storage tank failures spilled millions of gallons of fuel into floodwaters.Magellan has said only that the spill was “related to flooding associated with the hurricane.” Heine said Thursday that the cause remained under investigation.___Follow Matthew Brown on Twitter at www.twitter.com/matthewbrownap___HURRICANE NEWSLETTER — Get the best of the AP’s all-formats reporting on Irma and Harvey in your inbox: http://apne.ws/ahYQGtb .last_img read more

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  • Dairy looms as 11th hour NAFTA irritant as Trump advisers press for

    first_imgOTTAWA – Canada’s protected supply-managed dairy industry emerged as a major 11th-hour irritant as the Trudeau government returned Tuesday to what could be the final, pivotal round of talks to salvage the North American Free Trade Agreement.Two of Donald Trump’s top lieutenants turned up the heat on Canada to open up the protected sector that the U.S. president has repeatedly attacked. But Prime Minister Justin Trudeau remained unmoved.The pressure came one day after the U.S. president again blasted the Canadian dairy industry during his announcement of a trade agreement with Mexico that he said could replace NAFTA.Late Tuesday, the Globe and Mail reported that Ottawa was prepared to make concessions to Washington on Canada’s dairy market. The offer, the report said, is part of an effort to save a dispute-settlement system within NAFTA, maintain safeguards for cultural industries and avert tougher pharmaceutical patent protections.The report said Ottawa tried to offer more dairy market access to the U.S. during NAFTA talks in May, but the U.S. declined.Dairy is a politically charged issue that many analysts have predicted would be among the final conflicts to be addressed in the NAFTA renegotiation. In Canada, it is a near-$20-billion industry that employs more than 220,000 people. Supply management is considered sacrosanct in Quebec and Ontario — Canada’s two largest provinces, which mark the path to power for all political parties.Trump imposed a Friday deadline for Canada to join the U.S. and Mexico, which is when the administration plans to give Congress its mandatory 90-day notification of the new trade deal.Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Larry Kudlow, the director of the president’s National Economic Council, said in separate television appearances on Tuesday that concessions from Canada on dairy are essential to getting a three-way deal by then.“They may have some problems with the kinds of concessions we need,” Ross told the Fox Business News program Mornings With Maria.“They’ve been very bad to our farmers, particularly to our dairy farmers. The president has made clear that’s not something that’s agreeable to him.”Kudlow told the Fox show Varney and Co. that Trump would “love” to make a deal with Canada. But he said it has to be “a good deal which is in the interests of the American economy, the American workforce, American farmers.”The Trudeau government has repeatedly pledged to protect dairy farmers, but Canada has opened up limited access to its dairy market in previous trade talks, including its comprehensive pact with the European Union.The prime minister sidestepped a question Tuesday about whether he would be willing allow more access to the Canadian market.“My position on defending supply management has not changed. We will defend supply management.”It’s not clear that the United States actually wants to destroy supply management. Much of the American ire is focused on Canada’s decision to introduce a new classification of dairy product.In 2016, Canada created the Class 7 pricing agreement that has essentially restricted U.S. exports of ultra-filtered milk used to make dairy products. It allows Canadian dairy processors to buy domestic milk at cheaper world market prices than the higher prices under supply management. U.S. farmers say that’s a violation of Canada’s trade commitments.The head of Saputo Inc., Canada’s largest dairy processor, told The Canadian Press in June that the NAFTA dairy impasse with Trump can be resolved if Canada ends Class 7.Dairy Farmers of Canada has said that ending Class 7 is out of the question.On Tuesday, the organization released a statement re-iterating the need for Ottawa to protect supply management. It made no mention of Class 7. Officials from the dairy lobby were unavailable for interviews.On Monday, as Trump piled on his with his long-standing criticism of Canadian dairy, he did not single out supply management specifically. “You know, they have tariffs of almost 300 per cent on some of our dairy products, so we can’t have that. We’re not going to stand for that,” he said.Trump then dangled the possibility of imposing harsh auto tariffs to punish Canada. The Commerce Department is currently investigating whether to impose tariffs of 25 per cent on Canadian autos under national security provisions in U.S. trade law.last_img read more

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  • How major US stock indexes fared Monday

    first_imgBig technology and internet companies tumbled again Monday, leading to broad losses across the stock market. The Dow Jones Industrial Average briefly fell 500 points.On Monday:The S&P 500 index dropped 45.54 points, or 1.7 per cent, to 2,690.73.The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed 395.78 points, or 1.6 per cent, to 25,017.44.The Nasdaq composite plunged 219.40 points, or 3 per cent, to 7,028.48.The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks gave up 30.99 points, or 2 per cent, to 1,496.54.For the year:The S&P 500 is up 17.12 points, or 0.6 per cent.The Dow is up 298.22 points, or 1.2 per cent.The Nasdaq is up 125.09 points, or 1.8 per cent.The Russell 2000 is down 38.97 points, or 2.5 per cent.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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  • Madoffs former secretary seeks early release from prison

    first_imgNEW YORK — A lawyer for the former secretary for imprisoned financier Bernard Madoff is asking that she be released from prison in March.Attorney Roland Riopelle says 70-year-old Annette Bongiorno will have served two thirds of her six-year prison term by March 19 and should be released then.He cited a law signed by President Donald Trump last week permitting judges to order some prisoners released to home confinement after serving two-thirds of a sentence.He says her advanced age makes her eligible.Bongiorno was among five Madoff employees convicted for their roles in a scheme that cost thousands of investors about $20 billion. She was sentenced in 2014.Bongiorno maintained she was unaware of history’s biggest Ponzi scheme.Madoff is serving 150 years in prison.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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  • Grande Prairie RCMP investigating fatal collision near Debolt

    first_imgThe 39 year-old male driver of the pick-up truck, also from Grande Prairie, was transported to hospital via STARS Air Ambulance with unknown injuries.The lone occupant of the semi-truck was not physically injured.All possible contributing factors related to this collision are being considered and the collision remains under investigation. GRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Grande Prairie RCMP are currently investigating a fatal collision on Forestry Trunk Road at the 8 KM mark near Debolt.RCMP were called to the location on Thursday, March 29 at approximately 5:00 PM.  A pick-up truck was involved in a head on collision with a semi-truck.A 22 year-old male from Grande Prairie was a passenger in the pick-up truck and is deceased.last_img read more

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  • Alberta government to partially backstop new 2 billion bitumen upgrader

    first_imgCALGARY _ The Alberta government is providing a $440-million loan guarantee to help a Calgary-based company build a bitumen upgrader east of Edmonton.Value Creation Inc. says it’s ready to break ground on the $2-billion upgrader that would convert more than 77,000 barrels of diluted bitumen each day into medium synthetic crude and an ultra-low-sulphur diesel.Synthetic crude can flow easier through pipelines and the company says that would reduce the need for diluent or thinning agent while increasing pipeline capacity by up to 30 per cent. Notley said she’s unsure about the support the project would receive if another party were elected in the upcoming spring vote.“When we introduced this program … at the time the energy critic for the official Opposition referred to the businesses with whom we would be partnering or supporting as folks that were lining up at the trough,” she said.“That’s not necessarily a good signal, but it’s not black and white and I’ll leave it to them to speak to it.” Alberta’s official Opposition said there was nothing new in the announcement.“We agree that Alberta needs to pursue more upgrading, refining and petrochemical developments. The question is how best to achieve that, and we look forward to seeing a complete economic assessment from the NDP,” said Prasad Panda, energy critic for the United Conservative Party.He suggested the problems facing Alberta oil and gas producers will remain unchanged.“The premier told Albertans that a carbon tax on their daily living would secure so-called social licence for a pipeline. Albertans still have the carbon tax, but not an inch of pipe is in the ground.”center_img “With our proprietary technology we are able to first clean up this very nasty bitumen … such that we can achieve much lower capital costs, operating costs, energy costs and greenhouse emissions,” Columba Yeung, chairman and CEO of Value Creation, said Tuesday.Premier Rachel Notley said the loan guarantee for the Heartland Upgrader is part of her government’s strategy and is all the support the company will receive.“We’re just looking at the loan guarantee and … as you can imagine we’ve gone through an excessive amount of due diligence already. There would be much more due diligence that would go on between the letter of intent and the binding agreement being signed,” she said at a news conference.“Of course, we’d ultimately be looking at a number of conditions … before the guarantee would come in place.”Notley said the project is expected to create more than 2,000 jobs during construction and another 200 full-time positions once the upgrader is running in 2022. It was its advanced technology that made it an ideal candidate for support, she said.“It upgrades the bitumen so that there are more refineries in the world that can use it, which helps drive up the price for it. It reduces (the bitumen’s) volume to help with takeaway capacity, which we all know is a problem.”last_img read more

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  • Province gets ready for 2019 wildfire season

    first_imgUsing new technology, such as night vision goggles will aid in early detection and response. Building stronger working relationships with communities, First Nations, the forest industry and other stakeholders are important advances shares the Government.The changes support the recommendations of the independent Abbott-Chapman report. KAMLOOPS, B.C. – The B.C. Government is creating more funding, programs and fire prevention strategies after two of the worst wildfire seasons to keep B.C. communities safer.Wildfire management funding has increased by 58% to $101 million annually as part of the Budget 2019. The additional funding will help the BC Wildfire Service add to its fire response capabilities – adding more crews, enhancing aerial capacity and including innovative technology – and spending more on fire prevention activities, including a more comprehensive prescribed burning program backed by an initial $10 million shares the Government.“We’ve taken a hard look at additional steps we can take to not only prevent wildfires, but also enhance our response on the ground during wildfire season,” said Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. “Our base budget for wildfire spending has increased by 58%, and we’re accelerating prevention and prevention awareness programs.”last_img read more

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  • Logjam over Haryana hits AAPCong alliance in Delhi

    first_imgNEW DELHI: Logjam over Haryana seat sharing between the AAP and the Congress has hit the prospect of alliance in Delhi and fresh talks initiated by both the parties remained inconclusive on Thursday, the second day. Different versions of political leaders from both the parties kept coming throughout the day. While senior party functionaries came gave statements that there would be no alliance between AAP and Congress, there has been no official announcement of talks being calling off. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderSources said that last-minute efforts are being made from both the sides. “We had made one last effort. Sanjay Singh held talks, but can’t understand that after almost finalizing the matter and seat sharing, why the Congress stepped back on Wednesday evening,” said AAP Delhi convenor Gopal Rai. On Thursday, Congress also maintained that there would no alliance with AAP. Congress leader PC Chacko said the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) backtracked on forging an alliance with the Congress after a final understanding over seat sharing in New Delhi was reached between both the parties. Chacko said the Congress is ready to fight on all the seven seats, adding that the party will announce its candidates by Friday. “I had a discussion with AAP leader Sanjay Singh and we decided on a 3:4 formula. That was finally decided but then AAP was discussing some other states,” he said. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsHowever, at the ground a series of meetings took place inside AAP and also with the Congress, said sources. The problem stayed in the Haryana sit sharing formula where Congress did not accept the offer to give JJP three seats and opted to fight 7 seats. The AAP agreed to get 1 seat but pushed Congress to give JJP 3 seats which became the flashpoint between both the parties. Meanwhile, senior AAP functionaries on Thursday met with MP Sanjay Singh who was appointed as the key negotiator from the AAP, said sources. Earlier, the party informed that AAP is ready with the 4:3 sharing formula in Delhi but only if the alliance is sealed in Haryana and this has emerged as the major problem to form the alliance. On April 15, Rahul Gandhi accused Kejriwal of doing “yet another U-turn” saying he was not firming up the alliance despite Congress’ readiness “to give up 4 Delhi seats”. Responding to this, AAP national convenor and Delhi CM Arvind Kejriwal accused the Congress of indulging in rhetoric. He added that the Congress was helping the BJP by ensuring a split in the anti-Modi vote in UP and other states.last_img read more

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  • Justice minister Chosen Man of the Year 2014 by Maroc Hebdo

    Rabat – Justice and Liberties Minister Mustapha Ramid was chosen “Man of the Year 2014” by Moroccan weekly “Maroc Hebdo International” for his great person, integrity and honesty, as well as for the major reforms carried out in the justice sector.The weekly chose Ramid for his great person, integrity and honesty, as well as for the major reforms carried out to ensure an independent and competent justice system since it is the State’s most strategic and sensitive sector, said Maroc Hebdo in a statement.The justice minister chaired with know-how the high authority in charge of the national dialogue on the reform of the judiciary, set up by HM King Mohammed VI in 2012, it added. Ramid made sure that all components from across the political spectrum, trade unions and civil society are duly represented in the newly-created body, it noted.This political will was reinforced by the royal letter to the World Forum on Human Rights, on Nov. 27-30, 2014, which was read out by Ramid, the same source recalled. read more

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  • 60 Dead after Suicide Bomb Attack in Yemen

    Sana’a – At least 60 people were killed in a suicide car bomb attack on an army training camp in Aden on Monday, security officials said.Medics from Al-Wali hospital in Aden said that dozens of those wounded in the morning attack who were hospitalised had succumbed to their wounds.The car bombing struck a gathering of Yemeni army recruits at the camp. With MAP

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